February 2013 Maine Genealogist Is Out

The Febraruy 2013 edition of The Maine Genealogist is in homes now.  Articles in this quarter’s journal include:

The Two Families Of Stephen Carlisle Of York, Maine
   by Helen H. Butt

Three Sons Dead In The Civil War: The Family Of John Wilson Of Belfast, Maine
   by Rick Davis

Family Record of Ichabod Warren Of Denmark, Maine
   Submitted by Will Steere

Nineteenth-Century Records Of The First And Second Congregational Churches Of Wells, Maine
   Submitted by Priscilla Eaton

Lurena Bursley Leaves The Farm
   by J. Clarke Bursley


Also included are 3 book reviews for the following texts:

The Winthrop Fleet: Massachusetts Bay Company Immigrants to New England, (1629-1639)
   by Robert Charles Anderson (2012)
Early Families of Waterborough, Maine
   by Frederick R. Boyle (2012)
The Paternal Ancestry of Mary Rae Thompson
   by John E. D’Anieri (2012)


For more information about The Maine Genealogist and other benefits of becoming a member of The Maine Genealogical Society, please visit the membership page of our web site: https://maineroots.org/index.php/about/membership/

The Maine Genealogist – May 2010

The latest issue of The Maine Genealogist is in mailboxes now. As always, a great selection of scholarly articles. Here’s a rundown on what you will find:

The Family of John Reed of Topsham, Maine by Glenn D. Nasman

Stampless Letter: Loring Plummer Family of Maine contributed by Leslie D. Sanders

Charles C. McKim: Brush’un of Portland, Maine, and Impressionist of Portland, Oregon by Elizabeth S. Oatley

Bible Record of Joseph H. Wardwell of Rumford, Maine contributed by Leslie D. Sanders

The Maxwell Family of Scotch Hill, Ogunquit, and Wells, Maine by Priscilla Eaton

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814-1837 (continued) copied by Joseph C. Anderson II

The Maine Genealogist is the quarterly publication of the Maine Genealogical Society. For more information, please visit us on the web at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

The Maine Genealogist – November 2009

Have you caught up with the latest issue of The Maine Genealogist yet? Once again, our quarterly journal contains some great articles. A quick look at the table of contents shows:

The Return of Reverend Silas Hall by Michael F. Dwyer

Woodman Family Letter contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders

Origins of the Colby Family of Litchfield, Maine by Glenn D. Nasman

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814-1837 (continued) copied by Joseph C. Anderson II

Also included in this issue is the complete index to Volume 31.

The Maine Genealogist is the quarterly publication of the Maine Genealogical Society. For more information, please visit us on the web at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

Joseph Crook Anderson II, FASG, Honored

Joseph Crook Anderson II was honored for his contributions to MGS at the Annual Conference held in Bangor, Maine, on September 26, 2009, being presented with the inaugural Clayton Rand Adams Memorial Award.

MGS was honored to have Clayton’s widow, Nancy, and his daughter, Sarah, join us for the introduction of this award and the announcement of its first recipient.

The Maine Genealogist – August 2009

The August issue of The Maine Genealogist is now in circulation.

Four of the articles in this and the prior issue have something remarkable in common – the identification of children born to unmarried parents.

Editor Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, writes:

Illegitimacy in Colonial times was treated as a moral and financial problem. Early church records frequently document confessions of the sin of “fornication” or admonitions against persons having illegitimate children. For example, in 1790 the elders of the Second Church of Berwick felt it their duty to express to Susanna Hamilton their “abhorrence of her conduct as evil by suspending her from their communion & from all special privileges of the same.” The John Knight deed shows that the Massachusetts town fathers were more concerned about the support of the illegitimate children, and they took legal steps against the parents to ensure the children would not become town charges. As genealogists facing perplexing lineage problems, we should be aware that children born to unmarried parents was a fairly common event. Though it is often difficult to prove an illegitimacy, when proof is available it will most often be found in original church, town and court records.


A look at this issues Table of Contents shows the following:

Four Jonathan Nuttings of Cushing, Maine by William T. Ruddock

Marriages Performed by Reverend Thomas Gilmore Mitchell in Auburn, West Minot, and Madison, Maine, contributed by Cheryl Willis Patten

John and Mercy (Michener) Dennison of Cutler, Maine by Brent M. Owen

Destitute and Sick, contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders

Holding His Feet to the Fire! contributed by Janice D. Gower

Lemuel Rich Family Letter, Standish, Maine, contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814-1837 (continued), copied by Joseph C. Anderson II

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

The Maine Genealogist – May 2009

The May issue of The Maine Genealogist is hitting our members’ mailboxes now.

Our quarterly publication once again contains some insightful articles. Editor Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, writes:

Deciding when to publish can be a difficult decision for genealogists. We may have uncovered a wealth of valuable information on the family under inquiry, but are reluctant to release it to others while unanswered questions remain. Or we may think there is always more research to do and we don’t want to risk publishing incomplete or erroneous information. The problem, of course, is waiting too long.

Publishing our work should not necessarily be viewed as the last stop in the research process. If we are stuck on a problem or if we have made an error in our conclusions, making our research available to others may turn out to be the conduit for locating persons with the solution to the problem. Several of the articles in this issue demonstrate how that process may occur.
A look at the Table of Contents shows the following:

The First Family of Dr. Jonah Spaulding of Franklin and Somerset Counties, Maine by Linda Longley

The Death of “Mountain Mack” McKenney contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders

Children Without Parents: A Puzzling Entry in the Wells, Maine, Town Records by Priscilla Eaton, CG

Emerging from the Shadows: The Surprising Case of Elisha Thing of Waterboro, Maine by Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG

Bigamist Riverius Hooker and His Three Families, First Husband of Mehitable Baker of Pownalborough, Maine by Glenn D. Nasman

The Family of Captain John Bourne of Wells and Kennebunk, Maine: Ships and Shipwrights (concluded) by Priscilla Eaton, CG

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions: Volume 4, 1814-1837 (continued), copied by Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

The Maine Genealogist – November 2008

The November issue of The Maine Genealogist is hot of the press and should be in the mailbox of all our members.

This quarter’s issued contains some great articles, as well as a complete index to Volume 30. Articles included:

Some Descendants of Robert Mills of York, Maine by Helen Schatvet Ullman, CG, FASG

From New Orleans to Bremerhaven: The Voyage, Cargo, and Crew of the Barque Nimrod, June – September 1841 by Kenneth W. Heger

Allen Family Bible Record: Robbinston, Maine contributed by Stephen L. Robbins

Barnabas Baker of Litchfield, Maine – Patriot or Loyalist? by Glenn D. Nasman

William Bassett Bible Records, Winslow, Maine & Record of the John Ward Family of Gorham, Maine, contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814 – 1837, copied by Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

The Maine Genealogist – August 2008

Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, Editor of The Maine Genealogist reports:

“This issue of The Maine Genealogist proves once again that some of the most valuable genealogical information does not come from standard sources. Censuses and vital records are the basic building blocks of genealogy, but they rarely tell us anything about the quality of life or personalities of the people we are investigating. If we want to learn what it was like to walk in our ancestors’ shoes, we need to find records that provide insight into the personal challenges and circumstances that our ancestors faced.

“Nathan Barlow is familiar to all Maine schoolchildren as one of the Liberty Men who resisted the Great Proprietors in the early nineteenth century, but little else has been written about him. Author O’Flaherty has compiled a detailed account of Nathan’s life and family, with some of the most illuminating facts being gleaned from unusual sources including: an eyewitness account written by a neighbor describing a particularly defining moment in Nathan’s life, a criminal case heard by the Kennebec County Supreme Judicial Court, and the records of the Charlestown [Mass.] State Prison. She has woven the information into a story of a life marked by zealotry, financial difficulties, misdeeds, and ultimately tragedy.

“Authors Smith and Battick describe their frustration in tracking Emily Woodman, who seemed to have disappeared from the records shortly after her marriage. The eventual discovery of a divorce petition provided many of the facts they were seeking and offered the added benefit of a firsthand account of the suffering Emily endured in her marriage. Additional research uncovered a three-generation cycle of early marriage and divorce in Emily’s family, with the divorce records offering poignant details of these people’s lives not found anywhere else.

“Finally, who would think to look at the records of the United States Consulate at Bremen, Germany, for personal facts about our Maine ancestors? Dr. Kenneth Heger, director of the Family History Program at the National Archives, gives the example of a document found among those records which lists the ages and physical descriptions of a group of Maine sailors in 1841.”

So what’s the total lineup for the August 2008 issue of The Maine Genealogist?

Nathan Barlow (1776-1816) of Freedom, Maine By Ellen J. O’Flaherty

The Crew of the Barque Edinburgh: April – June 1841 By Kenneth W. Heger

Finding Hidden Gold in Divorce Records: The Search for Emily Woodman of Newport, Maine By Peter M. Smith and Nancy C. Battick

Bible Records of the Smiley Family of Sidney, Maine Contributed By Stephen L. Robbins

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814-1837 (continued) Copied By Joseph C. Anderson II

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

Roxanne discusses The Maine Genealogist

MGS friend Roxanne Moore Saucier is very well known to those of us in Maine who subscribe to the Bangor Daily News. Her Family Ties column has been a mainstay for many years. For those afar, you can keep in touch with Roxanne by following her columns at the newspaper’s website: http://www.bangornews.com/.

Her 02 June 2008 column, “Genealogy journal has perspective on ancestors,” discusses the content of the current issue of The Maine Genealogist, our quarterly journal.

You can read Roxanne’s comments by clicking on the following web address: http://bangornews.com/news/t/lifestyle.aspx?articleid=165075&zoneid=30.

We recommend bookmarking Roxanne – her weekly column appears every Monday!

The Maine Genealogist – May 2008

Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, Editor of The Maine Genealogist reports:

“With the publication deadline for the next issue of The Maine Genealogist always seeming to loom around the corner, I am deeply grateful to our authors who have contributed a steady stream of well-researched and interesting articles to share with our readers. Special mention must be made of Leslie Dow Sanders, who for years has provided this journal with many valuable Bible records and other family sources. Leslie has an uncanny ability for locating these items in all sorts of places, including the Internet, used book stores, and auction sites such as eBay. By publishing these records in the journal, we are preserving precious – and often fragile – family information, which may not be available anywhere else.”

What interesting articles can be found in this quarter’s issue?

Samuel Cates of Falmouth and Harrington, Maine: A Review of Current Knowledge and Discussion of His Parentage By Brent M. Owen, Wilfred A. Cote, and Frank C. Morrone.

The Parentage of Young Booker of Bowdoin and Gardiner, Maine By Priscilla Blount.

Jacob Waldron Swett Bible Record Contributed by Leslie Dow Sanders, along with a genealogical summary of the Jacob Waldron Swett family of Georgetown and Arrowsic, Maine.

Portland, Maine, Marriage Intentions, Volume 4, 1814-1837, Copied by Joseph C. Anderson, II, FASG.

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megs.

The Maine Genealogist – February 2008

Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, Editor of The Maine Genealogist reports:

The Maine Genealogical Society is pleased to present this first issue for 2008 of The Maine Genealogist. Although it has undergone a number of name and editorial changes over the years, the Society has now published its genealogical journal for thirty years – a major milestone for a small society. In this issue we offer a variety of material, including new compiled studies of two Maine families, a valuable Bible record, the first installment of a series transcribing the early Portland marriage intentions, and reviews of recent publications.

Readers familiar with the famous diary of Martha Ballard will be interested to learn about Martha’s brother-in-law, Dr. Stephen Barton, a medical doctor who practiced his profession in Vassalboro at the same time that Martha was midwifing in Hallowell. Dr. Barton’s account book provides an illuminating glimpse into the practices of a country doctor in the latter part of the eighteenth century. It is also noteworthy that Dr. Barton has the distinction of being the grandfather of nurse Clara Barton, the founder of the American Red Cross. And those of us familiar with common Maine surnames may not recognize Lincolnlue as one of those. In his article, author Nasman shows that the three Lincolnlue sisters of Bowdoin were the progenitors of at least 120 descendants in the first two generations alone.

The Maine Genealogist is published quarterly. For more information, visit our website at www.rootsweb.com/~megs.